guggulu

Ayurveda – Guggulu Herb

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Ayurveda – Guggulu herb and its medical importance

The Guggulu plant is widely distributed throughout India and adjacent dry regions. The tree is a small shrub with thorny branches. The gum, called “Guggulu” or “Gum Guggulu,” is tapped from the stem of the plant, and the fragrant yellow latex solidifies as it oozes out. Excessive production of the gum eventually kills the plant.

Uses:
A)Traditional/Ethnobotanical uses
The plant has been used in traditional Ayurvedic medicine for centuries in the treatment of a variety of disorders, most notably arthritis, and as a weight-reducing agent in obesity. Other traditional uses have included treatment of liver problems, tumors, ulcers and sores, urinary complaints, intestinal worms, swelling, and seizures, and as a heart tonic. In 1986, Guggulu was approved for marketing in India as a cholesterol-lowering agent.

B) General uses
Guggulu has been used in the traditional Ayurvedic medical system for centuries and has been studied extensively in India. Commercial products are promoted for lowering cholesterol; however, clinical studies do not support this claim. Anti-inflammatory and heart/blood vessel effects are being evaluated, as well as use in cancer, obesity, and diabetes.

Benefits:

  • Guggulu is warming and stimulates metabolism that is why it is one of the few botanicals that has been shown to treat hypothyroid conditions.
  • Guggulu also serves as an antipyretic in reducing fever and reduces secretions from diseased surfaces of the body. As such it is excellent when used synergistically with other anti-inflammatory herbs such as tinospora (guduchi), echinacea and goldenseal (hydrastis).
  • If guggulu is taken internally it acts as a blood detoxifier that breaks up stagnation in the body.
  • Take 1 to 2 teaspoons of guggulu powder 2 to 3 times a day with hot or lukewarm water or milk, it reduces the temperature and improves thyroid functioning.
  • Guggulu can be given in large doses several times daily for laryngitis, bronchitis, pneumonia and whooping cough. The fumes of burning guggulu can be inhaled for hay fever, acute and chronic nasal congestion, chronic laryngitis, chronic bronchitis and tuberculosis. A plaster of the powder applied to the pit of the stomach stops hiccough instantly.
  • Guggulu, as with other resins, is excreted through the skin, mucus membranes and the kidneys. This makes it particularly useful for the urinary tract and for a wide number of skin diseases including acne2 and psoriasis.
  • Properties:
    It is Alterative.

  • Antiatherogenic.
  • Antihypercholesterolemic.
  • Anti-inflammatory (powerful).
  • Antipyretic.
  • Antiseptic.
  • Antispasmodic.
  • Antisuppurative.
  • Aperient.
  • Aphrodisiac.
  • Astringent.
  • Bitter.
  • Carminative.
  • Demulcent.
  • Diaphoretic.
  • Disinfectant.
  • Diuretic.
  • Emmenagogue.
  • Enhances phagocytosis.
  • Immunostimulant (increases leukocytes).
  • Simulating expectorant.
  • Stomachic.
  • Thyroid stimulant.
  • Uterine stimulant.
  • home remedies:

  • If guggulu is taken internally it acts as a blood detoxifier that breaks up stagnation in the body.
  • Take 1 to 2 teaspoons of guggulu powder 2 to 3 times a day with hot or lukewarm water or milk, it reduces the temperature and improves thyroid functioning.
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